Can Barbra Streisand And Seth Rogen Turn You Into An Electrifying Salesperson?

By: Dave Dee on: May 16th, 2013 2 Comments

Have you seen the movie “The Guilt Trip”?

It’s the one starring Barbra Streisand and Seth Rogen where Rogen plays the inventor son who takes his nagging mother on a cross country trip while he tries to sell his invention.

Rogen’s character, Andy, has invented this cleaner which is so safe you can get it on your skin, in your eyes, even drink it and it won’t hurt you.

It took him five years to come up with the formula. He spent his entire life savings manufacturing tons of product (before he sold it.) And then set up appointments with major retailers like Costco and K-Mart to see if they would be willing to carry his product in their stores.

Besides the obvious big lesson here of testing to see if anyone is interested in your product or service before you invest tons of time and money in developing it, there is a great sales lesson in this movie.

You see, watching Andy’s pitch is painful—and while it is exaggeratingly bad, it gives some great clues about what not to do and what to watch for during your own sales presentations.

The reaction of the people Andy pitched his product to reveal clues as to what you should look for to determine if you’re on the wrong track when pitching your own products and services to your clients, customers and patients.  Things such as…

  • Shuffling in their seat
  • Checking their phone for emails
  • Staring at someplace other than you

What made Andy so bad? Well he spent all of his time on the scientific facts of the product—which was pretty boring. In other words, he focused on what HE thought was interesting instead of what his audience would find interesting.

Plus he didn’t emotionally hook his audience.

Once again Andy was focused on what he thought was important instead of what was important to his audience.

For example, Andy thought it was interesting that he was able to find the exact natural ingredients to create a cleaner that was not only safe, but didn’t contain any chemicals. While this is why his product worked, this wasn’t the first thing Andy needed to focus on.

Plus, he failed to find out or ask his prospective clients if they had pets or children that might get a hold of a cleaning solution in their own homes. Can you see how making his prospect think about his or her own pet or child may be in grave danger would hit a hot button?

In the end, with a suggestion from his mother, Andy is able to capture the audience’s attention and truly captivate the Home Shopping Network.

What made the difference?

Andy discovers that the person doing the screening test with him has a pet and a young child. So he shows her a familiar cleaner and asks if she uses something like that in her home, to which she replies “yes.”

Then Andy takes the cleaner he invented, takes the cap off and takes a swig of it right there on camera, asking if she could see the cleaning company whose product she uses doing that with their cleaner.

Would that get your attention?

I know it’d get mine!

The problem is that we don’t always do live pitches right? In fact, for some businesses, you may do all of your business online and may never even engage in live interaction at all.

So how do you look for the signs that you are boring your customers?

Well, tracking the time visitors spend on your web site and watching your videos can give you some indicators for starters.

But there is actually a much better way—something that you can use to make sure you never bore your audience and ensure they connect with you every time.

In fact, it’s the explanation behind why certain entrepreneurs get clients to buy and believe while others are often forgotten and ignored.  And best of all, it’s simple to do, once you understand it.

What’s cool about this is that rather than trying to convince someone your product or service is cool or interesting or superior, it automatically gets your audience to drop their barriers, stop being skeptical, believe what you say and trust your opinion.

In essence, it does what Andy did when he drank his cleaning solution: It taps on a hot button so powerful in your audience’s brain—in a predictable way—that people instantly focus on your message.

And that’s what you want people to do, right?

The reason this is important is because it no longer is enough to have the best product or service.  While fictional, Andy’s invention is a classic example. Who wouldn’t want a solution like Andy’s? One that wouldn’t kill you or make you blind if you happened to ingest it or get it in your eye.

Yet, no one and I mean no one, cared about Andy’s product…until…

Andy identified the way to capture 100 percent of his audience’s attention.

And that is step one.  You need to identify what will capture 100 percent of your audience’s attention. Because in today’s instant gratification society your battling shortened attention spans and an increasingly crowded message marketplace.

As he leaves the presentation, Andy and his mother discuss other ways they can capture 100 percent of his audiences’ attention in the future.

And that my friend is step two. You see, once Andy understood how he could get people to focus on him, he could replicate that and make his sales predictable in the future.  In order to succeed, you need a predictable, replicable way to immediately make a powerful connection with your audience, no matter what new products or services you introduce.

Recently I took a test that helped me to understand how I personally captivate people.  In essence, it helped me to better understand what I bring to the table naturally that helps me earn people’s attention so they want to stay focused on what I’m saying instead of heading to the next shiny object.

I discovered the exact things that make me be able to generate $300,000 in sales in a 90 minute presentation…so I can do these things each and every time—making sales predictable. (Take the test here to find out how you capture 100 percent of people’s attention here.)

In a distracted world, if nobody hears you, notices you, and remembers you, then they won’t be taking action on your message. If people aren’t buying your products or services the way you believe they should be, then take the time to find out what people find interesting about you so you can communicate this more consistently and predictably in order to get them to focus 100 percent of their attention on you.

NOTE:  Want more insider information on how to leverage marketing and sales to improve your business?  Click here to claim your special free bonus of $633.91 worth of marketing materials.

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    Dave Dee is one of Dan Kennedy's most successful students. Dave saw Dan speak over 16 years ago at one of the Peter Lowe Success Events when he was a struggling magician. He bought Magnetic Marketing and as you will hear when he tells you his story, his life changed in less than 90 days. Dave became a very serious student of Dan's by attending my seminars, joining his coaching group and most of all from implementing what he learned. Dave has become a top flight mentor and expert and is the GKIC Chief Marketing Officer. For more money-making marketing tips, tactics and strategies, go to

    2 Responses

    1. Dave,
      One of the lessons I wish I had learned at boot camp was ho to make that emotional conncetion with my target offices for my law office. I help people get on disability and I handle estate planning so the family, not the lawyers, gets the greatest benefit from the estate ! I think it you did industry specific examples of helping people craft that unique sellling proposition that has that emotional hook if the fascination that this lady is describing it as , it would be a killer addition to your boot camp or pave the way for you to do additionl training, web based , using those type of issue so that those of us that struggle getting this can see what you are talking about and ho that can transalte into a marketing advantage that can place them above the crowd we are curreently in. My thoughts anyway as a novice who wants to find and build an emotional hook with the two parts of the law I do and that could help me get and retain those higher dollar clients needed to make it to the top. My thoughts anyway.

    2. Mike Martel says:

      Great post. Way too often, we give our presentations, pitches and/or marketing based on what we like and not what our market wants. Great reminder.

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