How To Be A Big Thinker

By: Dan Kennedy on: November 9th, 2010 8 Comments

Let’s talk about: Bigger.

Most businesspeople spend way too much time and energy trying to figure out how to spend less acquiring customers.

Can I use bulk mail instead of first class?

Tri-fold the letter and mail it without envelope or grabber?

What – give something away?

Can I put the squeeze on my printer?

This sort of small thinking produces small results. I want you to work on ways to spend more.

More than you’ve ever spent before. More than any competitor would dare spend. So much that you cannot be ignored. That you “Wow!” the prospect with your marketing.

Maybe that requires raising prices, creating new high price/high margin services or upgrades, doing a better job converting prospects to customers, getting customers back more often. Maybe you need new ‘slack adjusters.’

Maybe you need to target different customers. There are lots and lots and lots of ways to change the economics of your business, so you can cheerfully pay more to get your customers.

Then you can be a Big Thinker. And get big results.

I have a confession that would curdle the milk in a C.P.A.’s morning coffee.

I have never once worried about the cost of a direct-mail campaign for any of my businesses, products or services.

Never once sat around trying to cut a corner or compromise to keep a lid on that cost. Never once tried to limit ‘stuff’ to come in under a certain weight, to avoid bumping to next postage rate. Never, never, never.

I have always, only focused on what I thought would get the best results. I think about the results, not the costs. To be fair, everything I do and have done has price elasticity.

I can easily adjust price and margin. But I posit most businesses offer more of that opportunity than their owners acknowledge.

Be a bigger thinker. It’s more profitable. It’s more fun.

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    ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

    Dan Kennedy is internationally recognized as the 'Millionaire Maker,' helping people in just about every category of business turn their ideas into fortunes. Dan's "No B.S." approach is refreshing amidst a world of small business marketing hype and enriches those who act on his advice. For more money-making marketing tips, tactics and strategies, go to www.GKIC.com

    8 Responses

    1. Paul Serwin says:

      No success story ever came from thinking small. This blog goes really well with yesterday’s on shaterring limits.

      We need to get past the limitations of not only what everybody tells us, but also the limits of what we can accomplish. In 2011, it’s time to take our businesses to the next level!

    2. Rob Anspach says:

      …I tested that theory about 10 years ago and although the cheaper mailings saved me money and did do a good at getting the phone to ring…the mailers that I didn’t skimp on that incorporated all the right stuff although cost more produce a far superior ROI. Not only was the return on investment greater, the clientele I attracted with the better mailer were more inclined to spend more money, refer us to others like them, and treated us with respect.

    3. Scott Martin says:

      It’s kind of the same with time. A lot of business owners believe they can skimp on marketing time using certain techniques and sometimes certain techniques and products help but there’s simply no easy substitute for grinding it out.

    4. Steve Soucy says:

      We get what we put out!

    5. Jack Fisher says:

      you are absolutely right .Small thinking goes with little self confidence .
      When you think small customers will see you small , nothing special to do business with.
      Thanks
      Jack

    6. Ertan Fırat says:

      Absolutely right !!
      good points

    7. Alex Herrera says:

      Great post! I totally agree with the thinking small concept, its a side effect from worrying about not having enough, yet scared to take a risk in achieving wealth status.

    8. I truly enjoy examining on this website , it holds excellent content . “He who sees the truth, let him proclaim it, without asking who is for it or who is against it.” by Henry George.

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