Most Small Business Marketers Play Blind Archery

By: Dan Kennedy on: December 21st, 2009 1 Comment

For more years than I care to count I’ve been figuring out small business marketing strategies for an incredibly diverse list of businesses, products and services and I’ve had a lot more victories than I have had defeats.

From all of this experience I’ve learned and developed both some fundamental concepts and specific techniques that are transferable from one small business to another to successfully market just about any product, service or company.

Whenever we talk about effective small business marketing we have to also talk about goals.

Most small business marketers like most people foolishly play blind archery. Archery is tough enough. Why make it more difficult?

The first step in the marketing process is to clarify what you want to accomplish. Many businesses ultimately fail because their marketing objectives are too shallow.

In other words, if you’re only objective is a certain level of sales volume and income your building your business on shifting sand rather than a solid foundation.

Hitting high sales volume goals is actually pretty easy if that’s all you want to do.

It starts to get difficult when you begin interlocking that objective with other objectives, such as a certain amount of profit and retained earnings, a certain level of quality in products or services, positive and lasting customer or client relationships and so on.

One individual I got to know built a 500 million-dollar company from scratch in thirty-six months. He once made the statement, “Making a million dollars was the easiest thing I ever did. Believing it could happen to me was the part that took thirty-seven years.”

Well there are two lessons in that statement, one more obvious than the other.

The obvious point is that making a lot of money is more dependent on your beliefs than on any other factor and I agree with that but there’s also a hidden lesson.

This fellow did build a half billion dollar empire in just three years and he did personally pass the millionaire mark several times over in that same time period but he also subsequently lost it all and more even quicker and is still some fifteen years later working his way through leftover, lingering legal problems.

Why?

He had too few interlocking objectives governing his marketing strategies.

His only clear objectives were to achieve high-financial benchmarks and build a large international sales organization and those objectives alone are relatively easy to achieve.

If you do not connect them with other governing objectives like, sustaining lasting relationships with satisfied customers, preventing lawsuits and legal problems, achieving certain retained earning levels, and so on.

So ideally one is to carefully construct an interlocking structure of goals, objectives, and values to direct your marketing efforts.

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    ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

    Dan Kennedy is internationally recognized as the 'Millionaire Maker,' helping people in just about every category of business turn their ideas into fortunes. Dan's "No B.S." approach is refreshing amidst a world of small business marketing hype and enriches those who act on his advice. For more money-making marketing tips, tactics and strategies, go to www.GKIC.com

    One Response

    1. Charles says:

      “Making a million dollars was the easiest thing I ever did. Believing it could happen to me was the part that took thirty-seven years.”
      thank you Dan I just started to believe that it is happening to me.

      carefully construct an interlocking structure of goals, objectives, and values to direct your marketing efforts.
      yes, I am working on better values n linking them to my goals
      thank you DAn

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