The secret weapon in any marketing arsenal

By: Dan Kennedy on: February 20th, 2015 4 Comments

Newsletters are a lot like a big cannon. A newsletter can provide lots of firepower and has a far-reaching effect that can spread out over a broad area. Like a cannon, a newsletter has a way of scattering and demoralizing the competition. When used regularly, a newsletter can have a positive impact on growing your customer base.

I know that anywhere from 50% to 70% of my private clients can be traced back as subscribers to my newsletter.

That’s a big chunk of business I would never have if I didn’t put out a newsletter.

Here are six important tips to remember when putting together a newsletter:

• The information should relate back to your product or service IF it is useful and entertaining

• Feature or focus on different consumer groups who might use your particular product or service – maybe one month direct the messaging to seniors, the next month talk to people on a budget looking to save

• Be sure to recognize and thank people who have given you referrals – it gives them a reason to give you even more referrals and it creates an incentive for others to do the same

• A newsletter is a great way to promote a new product or service, or create attention and excitement about a secondary product or service that you would like to promote

• Include articles, facts or information that should be passed along and shared with others – this also stimulates referrals

• Keep articles light, breezy and simple – don’t get too technical or give too much detail – a newsletter should entertain and inform, not confuse

If you’re not sending out a monthly newsletter to your customers, clients or patients you’re missing out on a huge opportunity to grow your business. You’re also losing money. If your competition is sending out a newsletter, they have a much better chance of sooner or later stealing away your customers. That means they will be taking money right out of your pocket.

GKIC makes it easy to get started and keep it going when it comes to creating a newsletter. Take advantage of a special offer this weekend only on the Newsletter Blueprints by going here now.


Dave Signature

Dan Kennedy, GKIC

P.S. Get “The 10 Rules to Transforming Your Small Business into an Infinitely More Powerful Direct Response Marketing Business” for FREE. Click here to claim your customer-getting, sales-boosting tactics.

Be Sociable, Share!

    Dan Kennedy is internationally recognized as the 'Millionaire Maker,' helping people in just about every category of business turn their ideas into fortunes. Dan's "No B.S." approach is refreshing amidst a world of small business marketing hype and enriches those who act on his advice. For more money-making marketing tips, tactics and strategies, go to

    4 Responses

    1. Dan puts profit into practical.

    2. Maros Feher says:

      …..great info….thxs for these tips…..much appreciated…

    3. David Hunter says:

      Got to love newsletters!

      Right now I’m subscribed to atleast half a dozen offline newsletters and tons online. The offline ones always get read by me.

    4. Scott Martin says:

      Excellent advice and I’m sending the first edition to my database in a couple of weeks.

      The key thing about the newsletter — I’m focusing on the clients I want.

      Inbound marketing has helped me build my copywriting business but to take my game to the next level, I need top clients. So I’m going after them with my newsletter … a print version.

      My general email database will get a digital version.

      One key Dan does not mention is the list of prospects. I’m compiling a custom database of the clients I want. It’s a time-consuming exercise but my competition will not do this. It gives me a huge advantage.

      You don’t have to publish an elaborate newsletter. You don’t have to have a huge list of potential or current clients. Just get started and be consistent. Hire professionals to complete the work you can’t. I can write my newsletter but I’m hiring a printer, a graphic designer, and a proofreader.

    Leave a Comment